05 May 2013

Configuring NFS in SmartOS

In the past, I've written up configuring NFS in Solaris, FreeBSD,
and Linux. Now I'll turn my focus to SmartOS. Briefly, NFS
(network file system) provides access to remote filesystems which
appear similar to local resources on client hosts. The following
focuses on NFS server and client configurations in SmartOS. Our
host details are:
        HOST (server):                  cn112 (172.25.0.49)
        HOST (CN (compute node):        cn110 (----)
        HOST (SmartMachine VM):         vm100 (172.25.0.100)
        PROMPT:                         HOST [0]
        OS:                             SmartOS 20130321T213641Z
        SmartMachine IMAGE:             smartos-base64-1.9.1
        NOTE:                           The following should apply
                                        equally well to previous
                                        versions of SmartOS.
Before explaining any logic or reasoning, below is the only command we
really need for our SmartOS NFS server node (cn112) and the two
commands for our SmartMachine client VM (vm100):
        cn112 [0] /usr/sbin/zfs create -p -o quota=1.5g -o \
        > sharenfs='rw=@172.25.0.0/24:@172.25.1.0/25,ro=@172.25.1.128/25,root=172.25.0.100' \
        > zones/nfs/c9fd4db6-5da0-4b0d-8c7a-87c55b10caff
        vm100 [0] /usr/sbin/mount -Fnfs -o rw,intr \
        > 172.25.0.49:/zones/nfs/c9fd4db6-5da0-4b0d-8c7a-87c55b10caff /mnt/nfs-pool
        vm100 [0] /opt/local/bin/grep nfs-pool /etc/vfstab
        172.25.0.49:/zones/nfs/c9fd4db6-5da0-4b0d-8c7a-87c55b10caff - /mnt/nfs-pool nfs - yes -
In the following setup, I include necessary network configuration
details since neither the server nor the client are currently
configured for our internal NFS segment. Without further ado, on
our NFS server we have no VMs, either SmartMachines or KVM instances,
since we are not using this host as a traditional CN. Also, we
have 2 network interfaces, though only one (the admin NIC) is
currently plumbed and addressed:
        cn112 [0] /usr/sbin/vmadm list
        UUID                                  TYPE  RAM      STATE             ALIAS
        cn112 [0] /usr/sbin/ifconfig -a
        lo0: flags=2001000849<UP,LOOPBACK,RUNNING,MULTICAST,IPv4,VIRTUAL> mtu 8232 index 1
                inet 127.0.0.1 netmask ff000000
        e1000g0: flags=1100943<UP,BROADCAST,RUNNING,PROMISC,MULTICAST,ROUTER,IPv4> mtu 1500 index 2
                inet 192.168.56.112 netmask ffffff00 broadcast 192.168.56.255
                ether 8:0:27:24:cf:6a
        lo0: flags=2002000849<UP,LOOPBACK,RUNNING,MULTICAST,IPv6,VIRTUAL> mtu 8252 index 1
                inet6 ::1/128
        cn112 [0] /usr/sbin/dladm show-phys -m
        LINK         SLOT     ADDRESS            INUSE CLIENT
        e1000g0      primary  8:0:27:24:cf:6a    yes  e1000g0
        e1000g1      primary  8:0:27:77:c1:cc    yes  e1000g1
        cn112 [0] /usr/bin/sysinfo | /usr/bin/json "Network Interfaces"
        {
          "e1000g0": {
            "MAC Address": "08:00:27:24:cf:6a",
            "ip4addr": "192.168.56.112",
            "Link Status": "up",
            "NIC Names": [
              "admin"
            ]
          },
          "e1000g1": {
            "MAC Address": "08:00:27:77:c1:cc",
            "ip4addr": "",
            "Link Status": "up",
            "NIC Names": [
              "nfs"
            ]
          }
        }
        cn112 [0]
Our second NIC, "e1000g1" is on the same LAN segment presented to
VMs by our other CNs. Below, I've configured the interface and
updated our configuration for retention through reboot:
        cn112 [0] /usr/bin/ifconfig e1000g1 plumb 172.25.0.49 netmask 255.255.255.0 broadcast + up
        cn112 [0] /usr/bin/grep nfs /usbkey/config
        nfs_nic=8:0:27:77:c1:cc
        nfs0_ip=172.25.0.49
        nfs0_netmask=255.255.255.0
        nfs0_network=...
        nfs0_gateway=172.25.0.49
        cn112 [0]
Over on our CN (cn110), we can see that we have 3 VMs configured,
2 of which are currently running. (The one we care about is "vm100".)
We can also see that only one interface is plumbed in the global
zone (GZ), that we have 3 NICs (admin, world, and vmint), and only
the "world" NIC (e1000g1) is currently in use by VMs:
        cn110 [0] /usr/sbin/vmadm list
        UUID                                  TYPE  RAM      STATE             ALIAS
        56800183-ab62-4db4-9d39-1fdc9a7e607a  OS    256      stopped           vm102
        c9fd4db6-5da0-4b0d-8c7a-87c55b10caff  OS    256      running           vm100
        e669fd30-7c81-463d-99bc-7989f9e8af78  OS    256      running           vm101
        cn110 [0] ifconfig -a
        lo0: flags=2001000849<UP,LOOPBACK,RUNNING,MULTICAST,IPv4,VIRTUAL> mtu 8232 index 1
                inet 127.0.0.1 netmask ff000000
        e1000g0: flags=1100943<UP,BROADCAST,RUNNING,PROMISC,MULTICAST,ROUTER,IPv4> mtu 1500 index 2
                inet 192.168.56.110 netmask ffffff00 broadcast 192.168.56.255
                ether 8:0:27:20:64:b9
        lo0: flags=2002000849<UP,LOOPBACK,RUNNING,MULTICAST,IPv6,VIRTUAL> mtu 8252 index 1
                inet6 ::1/128
        cn110 [0] /usr/sbin/dladm show-phys -m
        LINK         SLOT     ADDRESS            INUSE CLIENT
        e1000g0      primary  8:0:27:20:64:b9    yes  e1000g0
        e1000g1      primary  8:0:27:67:1e:93    yes  e1000g1
        e1000g2      primary  8:0:27:16:b9:c4    no   --
        cn110 [0] /usr/sbin/dladm show-vnic
        LINK         OVER       SPEED MACADDRESS        MACADDRTYPE VID  ZONE
        net0         e1000g1    0     72:53:2c:7d:77:17 fixed       0    e669fd30-7c81-463d-99bc-7989f9e8af78
        net0         e1000g1    0     e2:c9:ae:f6:82:1a fixed       0    c9fd4db6-5da0-4b0d-8c7a-87c55b10caff
        cn110 [0] /usr/sbin/sysinfo | /usr/bin/json "Network Interfaces"
        {
          "e1000g0": {
            "MAC Address": "08:00:27:20:64:b9",
            "ip4addr": "192.168.56.110",
            "Link Status": "up",
            "NIC Names": [
              "admin"
            ]
          },
          "e1000g1": {
            "MAC Address": "08:00:27:67:1e:93",
            "ip4addr": "",
            "Link Status": "up",
            "NIC Names": [
              "world"
            ]
          },
          "e1000g2": {
            "MAC Address": "08:00:27:16:b9:c4",
            "ip4addr": "",
            "Link Status": "unknown",
            "NIC Names": [
              "vmint"
            ]
          }
        }
        cn110 [0]
NIC e1000g2 (tagged as "vmint") on "cn110" resides on the same LAN
segment as e1000g1 (nfs) on "cn112". Also, verifying the above
regarding "vm100", we can see only one configured virtual NIC (vNIC),
which is attached to our "world" interface:
        cn110 [0] /usr/sbin/vmadm get c9fd4db6-5da0-4b0d-8c7a-87c55b10caff | /usr/bin/json nics
        [
          {
            "interface": "net0",
            "mac": "e2:c9:ae:f6:82:1a",
            "nic_tag": "world",
            "gateway": "10.0.22.254",
            "primary": true,
            "ip": "10.0.22.100",
            "netmask": "255.255.255.0"
          }
        ]
        cn110 [0]
In order to use the NFS services to be shared out from "cn112",
we'll need to add a new vNIC to "vm100". Below, we add the new
vNIC to "vm100", and verify it was configured:
        cn110 [0] /usr/bin/cat /var/tmp/vm100.addnic
        {
                "add_nics": [
                        {
                                "physical": "net1",
                                "index": 1,
                                "nic_tag": "vmint",
                                "ip": "172.25.0.100",
                                "netmask": 255.255.255.0"
                        }
                ]
        }
        cn110 [0] /usr/sbin/vmadm update c9fd4db6-5da0-4b0d-8c7a-87c55b10caff < /var/tmp/vm100.addnic
        Successfully updated c9fd4db6-5da0-4b0d-8c7a-87c55b10caff
        cn110 [0] /usr/sbin/vmadm get c9fd4db6-5da0-4b0d-8c7a-87c55b10caff | /usr/bin/json nics
        [
          {
            "interface": "net0",
            "mac": "e2:c9:ae:f6:82:1a",
            "nic_tag": "world",
            "gateway": "10.0.22.254",
            "primary": true,
            "ip": "10.0.22.100",
            "netmask": "255.255.255.0"
          },
          {
            "interface": "net1",
            "mac": "c2:9c:ab:c3:de:4d",
            "nic_tag": "vmint",
            "ip": "172.25.0.100",
            "netmask": "255.255.255.0"
          }
        ]
        cn110 [0]
As seen below, while the configuration for "vm100's" vNIC is in
place, the vNIC is not yet created or usable until after the "vm100"
SmartMachine is rebooted:
        cn110 [0] /usr/sbin/dladm show-vnic
        LINK         OVER       SPEED MACADDRESS        MACADDRTYPE VID  ZONE
        net0         e1000g1    0     72:53:2c:7d:77:17 fixed       0    e669fd30-7c81-463d-99bc-7989f9e8af78
        net0         e1000g1    0     e2:c9:ae:f6:82:1a fixed       0    c9fd4db6-5da0-4b0d-8c7a-87c55b10caff
        cn110 [0] /usr/sbin/vmadm reboot c9fd4db6-5da0-4b0d-8c7a-87c55b10caff
        Successfully completed reboot for c9fd4db6-5da0-4b0d-8c7a-87c55b10caff
        cn110 [0] /usr/sbin/vmadm list -v
        UUID                                  TYPE  RAM      STATE             ALIAS
        56800183-ab62-4db4-9d39-1fdc9a7e607a  OS    256      stopped           vm102
        c9fd4db6-5da0-4b0d-8c7a-87c55b10caff  OS    256      running           vm100
        e669fd30-7c81-463d-99bc-7989f9e8af78  OS    256      running           vm101
        cn110 [0] /usr/sbin/vmadm get c9fd4db6-5da0-4b0d-8c7a-87c55b10caff | /usr/bin/json nics
        [
          {
            "interface": "net0",
            "mac": "e2:c9:ae:f6:82:1a",
            "nic_tag": "world",
            "gateway": "10.0.22.254",
            "primary": true,
            "ip": "10.0.22.100",
            "netmask": "255.255.255.0"
          },
          {
            "interface": "net1",
            "mac": "c2:9c:ab:c3:de:4d",
            "nic_tag": "vmint",
            "ip": "172.25.0.100",
            "netmask": "255.255.255.0"
          }
        ]
        cn110 [0] /usr/sbin/dladm show-vnic
        LINK         OVER       SPEED MACADDRESS        MACADDRTYPE VID  ZONE
        net0         e1000g1    0     72:53:2c:7d:77:17 fixed       0    e669fd30-7c81-463d-99bc-7989f9e8af78
        net0         e1000g1    0     e2:c9:ae:f6:82:1a fixed       0    c9fd4db6-5da0-4b0d-8c7a-87c55b10caff
        net1         e1000g2    0     c2:9c:ab:c3:de:4d fixed       0    c9fd4db6-5da0-4b0d-8c7a-87c55b10caff
        cn110 [0]
Back on our NFS server (cn112), we check our zpool "zones" to
determine how much space we have before setting up an NFS share:
        cn112 [0] /usr/sbin/zfs list -r zones
        NAME                                         USED  AVAIL  REFER  MOUNTPOINT
        zones                                       4.32G  11.3G   654K  /zones
        zones/cf7e2f40-9276-11e2-af9a-0bad2233fb0b   323M  11.3G   323M  /zones/cf7e2f40-9276-11e2-af9a-0bad2233fb0b
        zones/config                                  38K  11.3G    38K  legacy
        zones/cores                                   31K  10.0G    31K  /zones/global/cores
        zones/dump                                   838M  11.3G   838M  -
        zones/opt                                    957K  11.3G   957K  legacy
        zones/swap                                  3.11G  14.4G    16K  -
        zones/usbkey                                 127K  11.3G   127K  legacy
        zones/var                                   73.3M  11.3G  73.3M  legacy
        cn112 [0] /usr/sbin/imgadm list
        UUID                                  NAME    VERSION  OS       PUBLISHED
        cf7e2f40-9276-11e2-af9a-0bad2233fb0b  base64  1.9.1    smartos  2013-03-22T17:11:29Z
        cn112 [0]
(Of note above, we see ZFS dataset
"zones/cf7e2f40-9276-11e2-af9a-0bad2233fb0b" already exists and is
related to image "smartos-base64-1.9.1". Given the function of
this node, that dataset is currently irrelevant.) We now get to
set up our first NFS share. By default, SmartOS gives us a "zones"
zpool consisting of all disk space and within this zpool, I've
created our NFS share dataset:
        cn112 [0] /usr/sbin/zfs create -p -o quota=1.5g -o \
        > sharenfs='rw=@172.25.0.0/24:@172.25.1.0/25,ro=@172.25.1.128/25,root=172.25.0.100' \
        > zones/nfs/c9fd4db6-5da0-4b0d-8c7a-87c55b10caff
        cn112 [0] /usr/sbin/zfs get sharenfs zones/nfs/c9fd4db6-5da0-4b0d-8c7a-87c55b10caff
        NAME                                            PROPERTY  \
          VALUE                                                                   SOURCE
        zones/nfs/c9fd4db6-5da0-4b0d-8c7a-87c55b10caff  sharenfs  \
          rw=@172.25.0.0/24:@172.25.1.0/25,ro=@172.25.1.128/25,root=172.25.0.100  local
        cn112 [0]
The shared dataset, zones/nfs/c9fd4db6-5da0-4b0d-8c7a-87c55b10caff,
is so named as its intended usage is by "vm100" on "cn110", thus
the end portion is "vm100's" UUID. (You can name your's however
you'd like.) Since "/etc" on "cn112" is transient in nature, we
didn't bother with files under "/etc/dfs" like we could otherwise
do under Solaris. With this being SmartOS, we instead can use ZFS'
native NFS handling via "sharenfs", which adheres to the same
nomenclature and conventions as the traditional "share_nfs" command.
Our SmartMachine, vm100, will have full root access to the share
given the options set above. Also, we've set a quota to restrict
the share to no more than 1.5 GB in size. After executing the above
'zfs create' command, our NFS share is immediately available as
seen below:
        cn112 [0] /usr/sbin/share
        -@zones/nfs/c9  /zones/nfs/c9fd4db6-5da0-4b0d-8c7a-87c55b10caff   \
           sec=sys,rw=@172.25.0.0/24:@172.25.1.0/25,ro=@172.25.1.128/25,root=172.25.0.100   ""
        cn112 [0] /usr/sbin/zpool history zones | /usr/bin/grep create | tail -1
        2013-05-06.01:17:56 zfs create -p -o quota=1.5g -o \
           sharenfs=rw=@172.25.0.0/24:@172.25.1.0/25,ro=@172.25.1.128/25,root=172.25.0.100 \
           zones/nfs/c9fd4db6-5da0-4b0d-8c7a-87c55b10caff
        cn112 [0] /usr/bin/head -3 /var/svc/log/network-nfs-server:default.log
        [ May  6 01:17:51 Enabled. ]
        [ May  6 01:17:52 Executing start method ("/lib/svc/method/nfs-server start"). ]
        [ May  6 01:17:52 Method "start" exited with status 0. ]
        cn112 [0]
Notably, we can see in our SMF log for our NFS server service that
method "nfs-server" started just seconds before the 'zfs create'
command was executed. This wasn't due to any errant command that
I didn't show; it was handled for us due to the "sharenfs" option
we passed to 'zfs create'.

Back on our CN (cn110), I've logged into "vm100", created a mountpoint
for our new share to be mounted to, and mounted the share to the
system:
        cn110 [0] /usr/sbin/zlogin -l root c9fd4db6-5da0-4b0d-8c7a-87c55b10caff
        [Connected to zone 'c9fd4db6-5da0-4b0d-8c7a-87c55b10caff' pts/4]
        Last login: Mon May  6 00:39:27 on pts/3
           __        .                   .
         _|  |_      | .-. .  . .-. :--. |-
        |_    _|     ;|   ||  |(.-' |  | |
          |__|   `--'  `-' `;-| `-' '  ' `-'
                           /  ; SmartMachine (base64 1.9.1)
                           `-'  http://wiki.joyent.com/jpc2/SmartMachine+Base

        vm100 [0] /opt/local/bin/mkdir /mnt/nfs-pool
        vm100 [0] /usr/sbin/mount -Fnfs -o rw,intr \
        > 172.25.0.49:/zones/nfs/c9fd4db6-5da0-4b0d-8c7a-87c55b10caff /mnt/nfs-pool
        vm100 [0] /opt/local/bin/df -h /mnt/nfs-pool
        Filesystem                                                   Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
        172.25.0.49:/zones/nfs/c9fd4db6-5da0-4b0d-8c7a-87c55b10caff  1.5G   31K  1.5G   1% /mnt/nfs-pool
        vm100 [0] /opt/local/bin/whoami
        root
        vm100 [0] /opt/local/bin/touch /mnt/nfs-pool/myfile
        vm100 [0] /usr/bin/truss -vlstat -tlstat ls -l /mnt/nfs-pool/myfile
        lstat("/mnt/nfs-pool/myfile", 0x0045F020)       = 0
            d=0x0000022200000003 i=8     m=0100644 l=1  u=0     g=0     sz=0
                at = May  6 01:57:52 UTC 2013  [ 1367805472.207230095 ]
                mt = May  6 01:57:52 UTC 2013  [ 1367805472.207230266 ]
                ct = May  6 01:57:52 UTC 2013  [ 1367805472.207246365 ]
            bsz=8192  blks=1     fs=nfs
        -rw-r--r-- 1 root root 0 May  6 01:57 /mnt/nfs-pool/myfile
        vm100 [0]

        cn112 [0] /usr/bin/truss -vlstat -tlstat ls -l /zones/nfs/c9fd4db6-5da0-4b0d-8c7a-87c55b10caff
        lstat64("/zones/nfs/c9fd4db6-5da0-4b0d-8c7a-87c55b10caff/myfile", 0x08047660) = 0
            d=0x0169000A i=8     m=0100644 l=1  u=0     g=0     sz=0
                at = May  6 01:57:52 UTC 2013  [ 1367805472.207230095 ]
                mt = May  6 01:57:52 UTC 2013  [ 1367805472.207230266 ]
                ct = May  6 01:57:52 UTC 2013  [ 1367805472.207246365 ]
            bsz=131072 blks=1     fs=zfs
        -rw-r--r--   1 root     root           0 May  6 01:57 /zones/nfs/c9fd4db6-5da0-4b0d-8c7a-87c55b10caff/myfile
        cn112 [0]
A quick test above via 'touch' also details that we can create files
on the new share from our VM as root. To further validate, I've
also checked the same file from the server side. Now, on to test
our configuration retention on the server side. Below, I've unmounted
the share from "vm100" and rebooted our NFS server. Post reboot,
I've checked our configured NICs and verified that our NFS share
is again presented for client access via 'share':
        vm100 [0] /usr/sbin/umount /mnt/nfs-pool
        vm100 [0]

        cn112 [0] /usr/sbin/init 6
        troy@glados [0] ssh -l root cn112
        Password:
        Last login: Mon May  6 00:13:28 2013 from 192.168.56.1
        - SmartOS Live Image v0.147+ build: 20130321T213641Z
        cn112 [0] /usr/sbin/ifconfig -a
        lo0: flags=2001000849<UP,LOOPBACK,RUNNING,MULTICAST,IPv4,VIRTUAL> mtu 8232 index 1
                inet 127.0.0.1 netmask ff000000
        e1000g0: flags=1100943<UP,BROADCAST,RUNNING,PROMISC,MULTICAST,ROUTER,IPv4> mtu 1500 index 2
                inet 192.168.56.112 netmask ffffff00 broadcast 192.168.56.255
                ether 8:0:27:24:cf:6a
        nfs0: flags=1100843<UP,BROADCAST,RUNNING,MULTICAST,ROUTER,IPv4> mtu 1500 index 3
                inet 172.25.0.49 netmask ffffff00 broadcast 172.25.0.255
                ether 2:8:20:a6:87:71
        lo0: flags=2002000849<UP,LOOPBACK,RUNNING,MULTICAST,IPv6,VIRTUAL> mtu 8252 index 1
                inet6 ::1/128
        cn112 [0] /usr/sbin/dladm show-phys -m
        LINK         SLOT     ADDRESS            INUSE CLIENT
        e1000g0      primary  8:0:27:24:cf:6a    yes  e1000g0
        e1000g1      primary  8:0:27:77:c1:cc    yes  e1000g1
        cn112 [0] /usr/sbin/dladm show-link nfs0
        LINK        CLASS     MTU    STATE    BRIDGE     OVER
        nfs0        vnic      1500   up       --         e1000g1
        cn112 [0] /usr/sbin/dladm show-vnic
        LINK         OVER       SPEED MACADDRESS        MACADDRTYPE VID  ZONE
        nfs0         e1000g1    1000  2:8:20:a6:87:71   random      0    --
        cn112 [0] /usr/sbin/sysinfo | /usr/bin/json "Network Interfaces"
        {
          "e1000g0": {
            "MAC Address": "08:00:27:24:cf:6a",
            "ip4addr": "192.168.56.112",
            "Link Status": "up",
            "NIC Names": [
              "admin"
            ]
          },
          "e1000g1": {
            "MAC Address": "08:00:27:77:c1:cc",
            "ip4addr": "",
            "Link Status": "up",
            "NIC Names": [
              "nfs"
            ]
          }
        }
        cn112 [0] /usr/sbin/share
        -@zones/nfs/c9  /zones/nfs/c9fd4db6-5da0-4b0d-8c7a-87c55b10caff
           sec=sys,rw=@172.25.0.0/24:@172.25.1.0/25,ro=@172.25.1.128/25,root=172.25.0.100   ""
        cn112 [0]
As seen below, we can immediately again mount up the NFS share and
see no data has been lost:
        vm100 [0] /usr/sbin/mount -Fnfs -o rw,intr \
        > 172.25.0.49:/zones/nfs/c9fd4db6-5da0-4b0d-8c7a-87c55b10caff /mnt/nfs-pool
        vm100 [0] /opt/local/bin/df -h /mnt/nfs-pool
        Filesystem                                                   Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
        172.25.0.49:/zones/nfs/c9fd4db6-5da0-4b0d-8c7a-87c55b10caff  1.5G   31K  1.5G   1% /mnt/nfs-pool
        vm100 [0] /opt/local/bin/ls /mnt/nfs-pool
        myfile
        vm100 [0]
Now let's retain the share mount point by updating "/etc/vfstab"
on "vm100". To test configuration retention here, also below, I've
logged out, rebooted the SmartMachine via 'vmadm' and logged back
in:
        vm100 [0] /opt/local/bin/grep nfs-pool /etc/vfstab
        172.25.0.49:/zones/nfs/c9fd4db6-5da0-4b0d-8c7a-87c55b10caff - /mnt/nfs-pool nfs - yes rw,intr
        vm100 [0] exit
        [Connection to zone 'c9fd4db6-5da0-4b0d-8c7a-87c55b10caff' pts/4 closed]
        cn110 [0] /usr/sbin/vmadm reboot c9fd4db6-5da0-4b0d-8c7a-87c55b10caff
        Successfully completed reboot for c9fd4db6-5da0-4b0d-8c7a-87c55b10caff
        cn110 [0] /usr/sbin/zlogin -l root c9fd4db6-5da0-4b0d-8c7a-87c55b10caff
        [Connected to zone 'c9fd4db6-5da0-4b0d-8c7a-87c55b10caff' pts/4]
        Last login: Mon May  6 01:31:09 on pts/5
           __        .                   .
         _|  |_      | .-. .  . .-. :--. |-
        |_    _|     ;|   ||  |(.-' |  | |
          |__|   `--'  `-' `;-| `-' '  ' `-'
                           /  ; SmartMachine (base64 1.9.1)
                           `-'  http://wiki.joyent.com/jpc2/SmartMachine+Base

        vm100 [0] /opt/local/bin/df -h /mnt/nfs-pool
        Filesystem                                                   Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
        172.25.0.49:/zones/nfs/c9fd4db6-5da0-4b0d-8c7a-87c55b10caff  1.5G   31K  1.5G   1% /mnt/nfs-pool
        vm100 [0]
For our verification, I've simply ran 'df' against our share mount
point. At this point, our work is now complete.



see also:
    Configuring NFS in Solaris
    Configuring NFS in FreeBSD
    Configuring NFS in Linux

1 comment:

BD said...

Thanks for your post. I just set up an NFS share on my SmartOS server and mounted it on a Linux box. I just want to give that one host read/write/root access and added that host to the ro, rw and root options e.g.:

ro=@1.1.1.1/32,rw=@1.1.1.1/32,root=1.1.1.1

However, no matter what I try, I can't write to the share,even if it's mounted rw. Any thoughts?